Is there a moment when all this stuff clicks?


#1

I have worked in healthcare for almost 20 years now and want out… was turned on to coding by a recommendation from friend. I’ve been back and forth with learning web dev for a while now. I will admit when it gets confusing I tell myself I’m not smart enough and coding isn’t for me and lose steam. I enjoy problem solving and some of the beginners stuff I’ve worked through so far, but when I get to reading and retaining a language outside of HTML/CSS that’s when the doubts creep in. Is there a moment when this goes from being something you are trying to learn to becoming a passion? Anyone had a similar experience and suggestions on working through it?


#2

It comes and goes for me. There are times you try something and start smashing it out and get it up and running quickly and there are times you try something new and it all goes to pot and you feel like you aren’t good enough.

Just know it isn’t only new learners who feel that way. It’s a rapidly expanding area and new things are coming out all the time.

This is a bit cliche but I honestly found it better when I started trying to make an app that interested me rather than just another todo list or something. Do you have any ideas for something you could create?


#3

Not anything specific. My interest lean towards fitness and the outdoors but haven’t thought of anything that’s not already been done. Not thought much of what to create…

I think I’m so consumed with wanting to learn as quickly as possible so I can make a career change before the end of the year I may be rushing things and putting to much pressure on myself.


#5

As a newbie myself, I can totally understand the frustrations and doubts when you don’t instantly get something. I think making a career change before the year ends isn’t really farfetched, some people have done it and it’s good to have goals! Let that little bit of pressure motivate you to code every single day rather than discourage you

TOP has a really good curriculum that’s easy to follow so you’ll have at least decent Web Dev knowledge by the time you finish the first course. Keep at it, and don’t feel bad when you have to re-read a lesson for 2, or 3 times (I did!) just to fully understand something


#6

While I’m no expert on programming or development in any level, I have a bunch of friends who are.
Whenever I don’t understand a thing and become frustrated, I usually turn to them to vent; every time I get the same answer.

They get very frustrated too! Which is weirdly encouraging for me, I mean, they are people who are employed by big companies, and they too have a hard time, but I don’t think that that diminishes their love for engineering at all.

I guess things clicking is stepping up to a new level of understanding.
One of the best books I’ve found for code beginners, --although the subject is python-- is this book (available in print and free online!): https://automatetheboringstuff.com/

The book assumes that the reader has never touched a programming language and does a good job of explaining some concepts that other resources gloss over.

Good luck!


#7

Five years ago, JavaScript seemed like dark wizardry to me. It was very challenging to grasp a few concepts. Nowadays I can write any simple program with relative ease, albeit I don’t few ready yet for a job.