Hey has anyone recently done the js part of odin + freecodecamp + codeacademy


#1

for those that recently did the js part of odin + freecodecamp + codeacademy

why exactly was either better to learn the basics for anyone that knows nothing about any of this stuff?

  • positives
  • negatives

if you did css for them, same question

codeaca had changed the content i think within last year, so you have to have done it after the change

free version


#2

Odin > FCC > Codecademy

Both FCC and Codecademy struggle from having you learn in an extremely controlled environment.
This reduces the amount of, what Michael Hartl says, “Technical Sophistication.” From his tutorial, which is a part of Odin later on, verbatim:

As you proceed through this tutorial, in all likelihood you will occasionally be tripped up by things not immediately working as expected. Although some particularly tricky steps are explicitly highlighted in the text, it is impossible to anticipate all the things that can go wrong. I recommend you embrace these inevitable stumbling blocks as opportunities to work on improving your technical sophistication. Or, as we say in geek speak: It’s not a bug, it’s a feature!

Codecademy and FCC aim to reduce any things “going wrong.”
While those things going wrong ARE frustrating, they are necessary and fundamental to eventually develop technical sophistication and becoming hireable for your skills.

That said, FCC is vastly superior to Codecademy in terms of presentation of content and building blocks.
Finally, there’s nothing wrong with doing all of them simultaneously.

Sometimes, when I need a break from Odin, I’ll go to FCC and churn through some exercises as light review and to mentally relax.


#3

but i dont think you answered the question:

are you saying based on you using the each within the last year or so

are you saying that one of these are more helpful for learning the basics for anyoen that doesnt know anything?


#4

For someone who wants to learn the basics of JS and CSS, I recommend Odin wholeheartedly.
Finish the first section, WebDev101, and then you can decide what to do next.


#5

how come git is taught first?

who made this section, or who made this?

ill ask them how come


#6

If you plan to be employed for programming at some point, you will 99.99% of the time need to know git


#7

I’ve been hopping across the three of them in the past few months, so I’ll have a go at answering. Although Jonathan’s first reply pretty much nails it.

CA
Pros: Controlled browser based environment (that can be very pleasant to use); Led by the hand learning. Can be useful for an overview or as a reinforcement tool.
Cons: See above. That controlled environment ‘just works’. We have no insight into how or why, which really pisses us off when our code fails to pass their test. Oh, also everything you do is stored in that environment - nothing to show off in a portfolio or share via Github. Being led by the hand doesn’t tax your brain cells. I can easily imagine doing practically a whole course with just copy/paste. If you don’t slow down to take notes and to properly fiddle with the code (or copy it your machine to tinker with) there is next to no retention.

FCC
Pros: Similar learning environment/experience to CA. Fantastic community. Will push you to think about your solutions. Will produce tangible end results that you can show to others.
Cons: Mainly the similarity to CA cons above. Some ‘Campers’ complain that the jump from the ‘gentle meander in the meadow’ of the challenges to the ‘Climb that mountain!’ of the zipline projects is too wide a gap - the exercises don’t equip you with absolutely everything you need to know to complete the projects. I tend to find that they provide enough pointers that I can then go crawling across the web to find the specifics of what I need. No idea when the re-write is going to be released - still working on test suites AFAIK.

TOP
Pros: This is it, the real deal, down to you. Got the balls? I’m paraphrasing the first page. WE won’t hold your hand. WE will help YOU to create your own build environment. WE will point you to some of the best information resources we or you can find. YOU will be required to read and practice and utilise them as you see fit. YOU will create, own, share everything.
Cons: “F*** me, this is hard work. Talk about getting thrown in at the deep end.” YOU will be required to read and practice and utilise the information as you see fit.

Sorry, veered away from JS specific a wee bit.
If you have absolutely zero experience of programming and you’re unsure if it’s for you, maybe CA is for you. At least the first couple of chapters… I found it a terrible slog, but it was good to use the later chapters about objects and stuff to get a better handle on exercises in FCC / TOP.

You’ve decided JS is for you. Do you want it seemingly easy, but with the occasional unexpected shift of gears and maybe woolly information now and again? FCC
Do you want a thorough grounding that is somewhat dependent on the effort you’re prepared to put into it? Something that will point you to all the info you’ll need, expose you to installing requirements, code testing & using Git even in the early stages, and that will push you from the get-go? TOP

I have a soft spot for both. FCC can be ‘fun’ - bang out a couple of challenges and feel like you’ve accomplished something for the day. The new TOP JS - MDN & JSInfo is what somebody should give you if they promise the best resources they can find. Cloning a Git repository and using Jasmine to test your code… as part of the Fundamental introduction to the language!?!


#8

guessing not that much time into each if already few months

comment from them had no substance, insignts or anything actually helpful or answered the question so ppl should only reply when they have substance or an actual answer to the question

it always confuses me when ppl comment when it doesnt answer the question


#9

Answer Breakdown

Your question was:

for those that recently did the js part of odin + freecodecamp + codecademy

"Why exactly was either better to learn the basics for anyone that knows nothing about any of this stuff?"

  • positives
  • negatives

if you did css for them, same question

The question is worded poorly, so let me rephrase it:

“Which is better for learning JavaScript/CSS as a beginner: Odin/FCC/Codecademy? What are some pros/cons?”

Let’s walk through my answer step by step.

Odin > FCC > Codecademy

This is line one. The > symbol is commonly used to indicate one side is greater than another side.
In this case, this sentence states that Odin is greater than FCC and FCC is greater than Codecademy.

This answers your question “Which is better for learning JavaScript/CSS as a beginner: Odin/FCC/Codecademy?”

Then I focus on the next part of your question.

What are some pros/cons?

I answer with:

Both FCC and Codecademy struggle from having you learn in an extremely controlled environment.
This reduces the amount of, what Michael Hartl says, “Technical Sophistication.” From his tutorial, which is a part of Odin later on, verbatim: […Quoted Text…]

This identifies FCC/Codecademy as the two subjects I will be identifying as either having a pro/con.
I establish that there is a con because you are learning an extremely controlled environment.
I then further explain why it is a con to do so, by introducing a concept called technical sophistication and quote a source to support my statement.

My next paragraph is just additional, potentially redundant text, to explain why this is such a big dealbreaker.

That said, FCC is vastly superior to Codecademy in terms of presentation of content and building blocks.
Finally, there’s nothing wrong with doing all of them simultaneously.

Now that I have asserted that Odin is greater than FCC/Codecademy due to the technical sophistication issue, I compare FCC and Codecademy.
I say that FCC is better than Codecademy because of its presentation and building blocks.

Conclusion

I hope this helps you understand my previous answer and come to a decision on starting a learning resource.


#10

To be fair it’s a bit of a broad question. Everyone being different will result in each giving a different answer… our personal prejudices & learning styles will have more influence over our opinions than any ‘facts’.

Not JS specific, but the whole internet raves about Colt Steele’s WebDev Bootcamp on Udemy. Yet I struggle with it - just because it’s video lecture based.

I like & use Codecademy - as a tool to get a basic overview (I’ve done all of the freely available HTML/CSS/JS that they have). I don’t like the fact that the answer is right there in front of you and that you could just copy a tiny bit of text & paste it into the correct place of a pre-formatted template. I (and any employer on the planet!) don’t consider that really learning and getting to grips with the technology.

I mentioned already that I enjoy using FCC. It cuts a middle path that requires you to think and understand what is placed before you - you will even have to do some research on your own, but it smooths away all the other possible frustrations by providing a safe environment. While this lets you focus solely on understanding, using and retaining the info presented, it does abstract away all the other stuff that is part of a day-in-the-life of pretty much any technical job. “I know JS!” isn’t going to have people beating down your door. “I understand and can use JS in conjunction with technologies x, y & z.” is more likely to pique someone’s interest. That isn’t to say it’s not worthwhile! You will have portfolio pieces from the end of section zipline challenges (and a certificate if you complete the stages) that will demonstrate your proficiency with that technology. For reference, I’m in the final stages of the frontend certification program, so the advanced JS algorithms section.

The TOP introductory WebDev101 is a condensed course in it’s own right. I think I’ve got more from the fundamentals here than from 80% of the FCC Frontend certification. And there’s still an Advanced section later in the curriculum! The portfolio pieces are not of a lesser standard to show people how proficient you are (NB: The simple fact of being able to display a portfolio [of projects that started life on your personal machine] shows a certain level of proficiency with multiple technologies). The fact I’d used CA & FCC to familiarise myself with aspects previously surely went some way to easing my passage. But nothing from those places would have prepared me, or given any practical experience, of version control with Git, of package managers, compilers, test tools. Hell, just getting back to a comfortable level using the command line! OK, these things aren’t all JS specific, but they are all part of being usefully productive in the big scary world of having a job! PS: The link to the SQL Intro course from WebDev101 was instrumental in getting me my current job.

It’s not easy… It’s not just about picking up & remembering some syntax rules. That “everyone can learn to code” that gets shoved in our faces by every YT video is only part of the story. Like many things in life, the pain we have to endure can often be indicative of how worthwhile the end result will be. Or if you prefer a science-y view - zero input = zero output.


#11

i thinck tha freecodecamp is the best first to learn code front end


#12

Hi dudes I am currently going through the algorithmic challenges/certification of FCC.

I shall note that besides regular expressions there is not something new that I have learned/wasn’t already included in JS Web development 101 course of the odin project…

Apart from that, as all the other guys told regarding the cons of FCC, for me it is that you build and play around something that doesn’t provide hands on experience. You simple open up a browser window or codepen and everything works magically.

The linux approach/set up your own environment of TOP is as a whole much better.

Personally for TOP the only downside is that people are not that much in the forum and prefer hanging around on gitter(chat room) but ok that’s just me being quirky,…